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Latest Health News from Duke Medicine News and Communications

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Worms and Germs Lead to Better Immune Function

A growing body of evidence in the medical community holds that greater diversity of bacteria and even worms in the digestive tract offers protection against a variety of allergic and autoimmune problems. A growing body of evidence in the medical community holds that greater diversity of bacteria and even worms in the digestive tract offers protection against a variety of allergic and autoimmune problems.

Nearly 1 in 10 Adults Has Impulsive Anger Issues and Access To Guns

An estimated 9 percent of adults in the U.S. have a history of impulsive, angry behavior and have access to guns, according to a study published this month in Behavioral Sciences and the Law. The study also found that an estimated 1.5 percent of adults report impulsive anger and carry firearms outside their homes.

Duke Research Teams Win Large Federal Grants for HIV Vaccine Studies

Two research teams at Duke Medicine have received large, multi-year grants from the National Institutes of Health to pursue projects on HIV vaccine development.

Findings in Post-Injury Arthritis Garner Top Honor in Orthopedics Research

A team of Duke Medicine researchers has earned the highest honor for research in orthopedic surgery after more than a decade of investigation into arthritis caused by traumatic injury. Post-traumatic osteoarthritis accounts for about 12 percent of all cases, affecting about 6 million people in the U.S. each year.

Severe Malaria Marked by Unique Biochemical Changes

When patients are suffering from the most severe form of malaria, known as cerebral malaria, infected red blood cells are trapped within the microscopic vessels of the brain. This impedes critical oxygen delivery, resulting in coma and often leading to death.

ER Patients Discharged After Kidney Stone Evaluation Likely to Return

One in nine patients released from the emergency department after treatment for a kidney stone will face a repeat visit, according to findings by Duke Medicine researchers.

Tests to Diagnose Coronary Artery Disease Come With Similar Costs

A new type of CT scan initially costs slightly less than the traditional stress test to diagnose blocked coronary arteries in patients with chest pain, but its lower cost did not translate into medical care savings over time, according to an analysis by Duke Medicine researchers.

Health Outcomes Equal for Patients Diagnosed by CTA or Stress Test

Patients with chest pain have similar rates of heart attacks and other major cardiac events within two years whether they were evaluated with a new type of CT scan or the traditional stress test, according to results presented today by Duke Medicine researchers at a meeting of the American College of Cardiology.

Statin Guidelines Miss Middle-Age Patients and Over-Target Seniors

The newest guidelines for the use of cholesterol-lowering statins in people at risk of heart disease may be too generic, excluding middle-aged adults who could benefit from the drugs, and over-prescribing in older adults, according to a new study from the Duke Clinical Research Institute.

Tetanus Shot Improves Patient Survival With Brain Tumor Immunotherapy

An innovative approach using a tetanus booster to prime the immune system enhances the effect of a vaccine therapy for lethal brain tumors, dramatically improving patient survival, according to a study led by Duke Cancer Institute researchers.

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