Breadcrumbs Navigation

Home > News & Publications > News and Communications > News

Latest Health News from Duke Medicine News and Communications

 « Previous 10 Page of 29 Next 10 »

Heart Patients Can Stop Blood Thinners When Undergoing Elective Surgery

Patients with atrial fibrillation who stopped taking blood thinners before they had elective surgery had no higher risk of developing blood clots and less risk of major bleeding compared to patients who were given a “bridge” therapy, according to research led by Duke Medicine.



Duke Human Vaccine Team Awarded Up to $9 million To Study Fungal Fever

The Duke Human Vaccine Institute’s Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Unit has received an initial award of approximately $5 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) to support further research on Valley Fever Pneumonia. Total funding could be up to $9 million over the course of the contract if all contract options are exercised.

Lymph Nodes Signal More Aggressive Thyroid Cancer Even in Young Patients

Patients older than age 45 with thyroid cancer that has spread to neck lymph nodes have long been considered at higher risk of dying, but the same has not been true for younger patients.

Antibody Response Linked To Lower Mother-to-Child HIV Transmission

How most babies are protected from acquiring HIV from their infected mothers has been a matter of scientific controversy. Now researchers at Duke Medicine provide new data identifying an antibody response that had long been discounted as inadequate to confer protection.

Diabetes Drug Sitagliptin Shows No Increased Risk Of Heart Events


MRI Technology Reveals Deep Brain Pathways in Unprecedented Detail

cientists at Duke Medicine have produced a 3-D map of the human brain stem at an unprecedented level of detail using MRI technology.

Duke’s Poliovirus Study Finds That Less Is More

A modified poliovirus therapy that is showing promising results for patients with glioblastoma brain tumors works best at a low dosage, according to the research team at Duke’s Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center where the investigational therapy is being pioneered.

Bladder Cells Regurgitate Bacteria to Prevent UTIs

Duke Medicine researchers have found that bladder cells have a highly effective way to combat E. coli bacteria that cause urinary tract infections (UTIs).

Kidney Failure Impacts Survival of Sepsis Patients

DURHAM, N.C. – Researchers at Duke Medicine have determined that kidney function plays a critical role in the fate of patients being treated for sepsis, a potentially life-threatening complication of an infection.


Old Bones Can Regain Youthful Healing Power

Broken bones in older people are notoriously slow to heal, but researchers at Duke Medicine have identified a potential way to speed the process.

 « Previous 10 Page of 29 Next 10 »