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Latest Health News from Duke Medicine News and Communications

Frailty Among Older Heart Patients Helps Predicts Severe Outcomes

Frailty among older people with cardiovascular disease appears to be more predictive than age for gauging their risk of heart attack, stroke and death, according to an international study that included researchers at Duke Medicine.

Dean Nancy Andrews Named to National Academy of Sciences

Nancy C. Andrews, M.D., Ph.D., dean of the Duke University School of Medicine, has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, an advisory organization to the president and Congress composed of experts in all scientific fields.

Your Adolescent Brain On Alcohol: Changes Last Into Adulthood

Repeated alcohol exposure during adolescence results in long-lasting changes in the region of the brain that controls learning and memory, according to a research team at Duke Medicine that used a rodent model as a surrogate for humans.

Duke Physician To Lead AMA’s RUC Committee

Peter K. Smith, M.D., chief of the Division of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery at Duke University School of Medicine, has been appointed chairman of the American Medical Association/Specialty Society Relative Value Scale Update Committee, also known as the RUC.

Heart Attack Risk High in Divorced Women, Even After Remarrying

Divorced women suffer heart attacks at higher rates than women who are continuously married, a new study from Duke Medicine has found. A woman who has been through two or more divorces is nearly twice as likely to have a heart attack when compared to their stably-married female peers, according to the findings.


Worms and Germs Lead to Better Immune Function

A growing body of evidence in the medical community holds that greater diversity of bacteria and even worms in the digestive tract offers protection against a variety of allergic and autoimmune problems. A growing body of evidence in the medical community holds that greater diversity of bacteria and even worms in the digestive tract offers protection against a variety of allergic and autoimmune problems.

Nearly 1 in 10 Adults Has Impulsive Anger Issues and Access To Guns

An estimated 9 percent of adults in the U.S. have a history of impulsive, angry behavior and have access to guns, according to a study published this month in Behavioral Sciences and the Law. The study also found that an estimated 1.5 percent of adults report impulsive anger and carry firearms outside their homes.

Duke Research Teams Win Large Federal Grants for HIV Vaccine Studies

Two research teams at Duke Medicine have received large, multi-year grants from the National Institutes of Health to pursue projects on HIV vaccine development.

Findings in Post-Injury Arthritis Garner Top Honor in Orthopedics Research

A team of Duke Medicine researchers has earned the highest honor for research in orthopedic surgery after more than a decade of investigation into arthritis caused by traumatic injury. Post-traumatic osteoarthritis accounts for about 12 percent of all cases, affecting about 6 million people in the U.S. each year.

Severe Malaria Marked by Unique Biochemical Changes

When patients are suffering from the most severe form of malaria, known as cerebral malaria, infected red blood cells are trapped within the microscopic vessels of the brain. This impedes critical oxygen delivery, resulting in coma and often leading to death.

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